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The Mouse Guard RPG is by Luke Crane and David Petersen, and is . Released originally in 2008 as a hard cover version (a PDF version is.. 27 May 2017 - 24 min - Uploaded by The Board Game KaptainThe Board Game Kaptain reviews and discussed the rules for Mouse Guard second edition.. Download Mouse Guard Roleplaying Game Box Set, 2nd Ed. .


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Mouse Guard: How the Game Works | Coven | BoardGameGeek
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MouseGuard by David Petersen
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David Petersen and Luke Crane have turned to crowdfunding platform Kickstarter today to bring a Mouse Guard game into reality. Their goal is $18,000, and they’re nearly halfway there already. It.


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Mouse Guard: Swords & Strongholds by Burning Wheel — Kickstarter
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A two-player board game from the Mouse Guard comics—for guardmice, patrons mouse guard board game the June Alley Inn and their fans.
Recently, he asked Luke Crane of and the Mouse Guard RPG to mouse guard board game up with some rules for the game and so we did!
We developed a light strategy game for two players that takes 10 to 20 minutes time per game.
It's exactly the sweet spot we hoped for—a game mouse guard board game can play while you're sitting at the June Alley Inn listening to tales, or when you're waiting for your friends to arrive for a game night, or when you're waiting in long lines at comicons!
After he depicted the game in the comics, David created a prototype based on his drawings.
This is what we started with for the game design.
The game has a wooden gridded board, four mouse pawns for each player and mouse guard board game deck of sword, stronghold and diplomacy cards.
After we created the initial rules, we sent out a print and play version to our friends and fans to play test for us.
Notably, Scott and Rym from the gave it mouse guard board game good thrashing for us.
We want to do a small production run with high quality components for Mouse Guard fans everywhere and we need your help to do it.
We'd much rather show this game to you so you can tell us what you think than gamble on printing off a bunch and shipping them straight into distribution.
David and I love our fans and we want you to be a part of making this game.
The game mouse guard board game be contained in a cardboard two piece box with a full color wrap.
A few lucky backers can acquire some of David's original art for the game.
We're offering, individually, the face of each card and the card back.
Each piece is 4.
The original inks for the cover are 8.
It's a unique piece by David, since his typical pieces are character commissions and comic art.
Risks and challenges This game will be published by The Burning Wheel.
I've published over a dozen titles through Burning Wheel, including a boxed set game, but this will be our first board game.
Making board games can be hard!
Pick up your mouse guard board game at the con if it's ready!
Pick up your copy at the con if it's ready!
Pick up your copy at just click for source con if it's ready!
You'll also receive a print and play version of the game.
You'll also receive a print and play version of the game.
A deluxe version of the game with a hardwood board, cast metal mouse pawns and fancy cards all kept in a wooden, felt-lined box and a signed copy of the game.

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Mice and Mystics is a beautifully-produced board game that creates a relatively all-ages-friendly dungeon crawl RPG experience without need for a dungeon master. "My kids went absolutely bananas.


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Mouse Guard: Swords & Strongholds by Burning Wheel — Kickstarter
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Mouse Guard: How the Game Works | Coven | BoardGameGeek
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Rewards You earn rewards for the way you play your character in a session.
Rewards are accrued in points.
These points are used to modify dice rolls.
There are two types of point: fate points and persona points.
Rewards are distributed at the end of a session.
When play has ended, go around the table.
Each player in turn reads his Belief, Goal and Instinct.
If the group agrees that the criteria below are met, then the applicable reward is earned.
Fate Points There are three ways to earn fate points.
You may earn up to 3 fate points in one session.
You may earn up to 4 in one session.
Can be awarded to more than one player, but not to every player The Mission A mission will be introduced by the Game Master GM and will include the following elements: 1 Season of the year.
This can affect weather - which can also have a big impact on game play.
After the mission is introduced, the players will write down their mission Goal s on their character sheet.
It's easy to simply write the mission as your current Goal.
After awhile, though, that's going to get boring.
Fortunately, Goals are versatile.
You have a lot of leeway; you don't have to stick strictly to the mission.
Look at your Goals as a group: One player should always have a Goal about completing the mission.
You can color that with conditions or stipulations - how will he complete the Goal?
Other players mouse guard board game have: a Goal about another member of your patrol, a Goal about seeing something or retrieving something from the place you're going.
If you're family, mentor, friend or enemy is located near the mission objective, write a Goal about them.
Some examples: "I will protect Kenzie and Lieam on this patrol.
For without these tests, how does a mouse truly become a hero?
The GM's Turn There are 2 turns in a mouse guard board game session.
The GM's turn and then the Player's turn.
During the GM's turn, flintstone game his job to beat the crap out of the players.
Well, their characters anyway.
Initially, the GM may provide options to overcome obstacles due to the inexperience of the players.
During the course of overcoming these obstacles, the mice may be inflicted with various conditions such as Hunger, Anger, Exhaustion, Injuries or Sickness.
A 'test' is a roll of the dice.
There are 3 kinds of obstacles guardsmice may face: 1 Simple obstacles - which usually only require 1 test.
If the player succeeds link testing against the obstacle, they get what they want which is usually to overcome the obstacleand the player and the GM can provide a little bit of color commentary about the achievement to celebrate the moment.
If the player fails, one of two things can happen: 1 The Read more can decide that the obstacle was insurmountable, and can throw an unexpected twist into the story as a result, or 2 The GM can allow you to overcome the obstacle, but will apply a condition to the mouse tired, angry, etc.
In either case, the GM gets to describe the scene and what happens.
The Players' Role During the GM's Turn During the confrontation of these obstacles, the players will describe their character's reactions and actions as they attempt the tests.
The GM will evaluate the suggested course of action and will may set an obstacle number against which the player will need to test more on this later.
Players can use their traits to either help or hinder them when making these tests.
Incorporating a trait in a beneficial way will add bonus dice or even rerolls.
Using a trait against yourself, earns the player 'checks' which can be spent during the Players' Turn.
Checks are very valuable and useful.
It's your job to be proactive about earning them.
A hero risks himself to overcome his own weaknesses and improve the common good with his sacrifice.
Sometimes during the GM's turn, disagreements may arise amongst the players.
These disagreements can be resolved using in-game conflict test mechanics.
The GM's turn ends under one of three circumstances: 1 The patrol has completed its mission.
The play is then turned over to the Players for the Player's Turn.
The Players' Turn It's the GM's job to beat the crap out of your guardmice.
It's your job to survive the beating and overcome!
During the Players' Turn you may try to recover a bit and build up your resources in addition to taking care of other, miscellaneous business.
Checks and Tests Tests in the Players' Turn are limited.
Each player gets one free test.
You can use it for whatever you want - to recover, to find an old friend, to fashion new armor, to pick a fight or buy a gift for your love.
If you want more tests, you must spend the checks you earned against your traits in the GM's turn.
So remember, when you use your traits to get in your way during the GM's turn, it gives you more options to do more stuff in the Players' Turn.
When you've run out of checks, you're done for this turn.
Note 1: You cannot spend a check for a test twice in a row.
Note 2: You can donate checks to other players.
Note 3: Each player takes a turn spending 1 check at a time.
As soon as any player runs out of checks during a specific round, any players that haven't yet gone that round can finish, and then the Players' Turn is over.
Any excess checks are discarded.
Recover You may use a check to attempt to recover from one or more of your conditions Hungry, Angry, etc.
This will involve rolling a test more on this later.
Regroup You can make tests against your Resources value for things like equipment to help you continue.
Or against your Circles value to find help or allies, or against your craft skill to create useful items.
Picking Fights and Stuff You can also get into full-blown conflicts with fellow players' mice, your relationship characters or characters the GM has introduced.
It only costs one check to start a conflict.
Your victim doesn't have to spend anything to fight back.
Note: You may not use your traits against yourself to earn more checks during the Players' Turn GM's Role in the Players' Turn The GM doesn't get to sit around during the Players' Turn and just watch.
He has 3 very important duties: prompt the players with the rules, play the relationships and stay involved.
Obstacles In this game, an obstacle is broken down into 3 parts: have monopoly board game online play opinion A description by the GM.
For example: To cross a frigid stream 1requires the characters to this web page an obstacle 3 2 Health test 3.
To pass a test, you need a number of successes equal to or greater than the obstacles difficulty.
Successes are counted for each 4, 5 or 6 of each die rolled.
For example: Using the example above, if your Health ability is 5, you would get to roll 5 dice.
And you would need 3 successes to overcome that test because of it's rating.
Tests A test refers to a roll of the dice for a single ability or skill.
You make tests to overcome obstacles.
Who Makes the Test?
The player to volunteer first or think of the plan to overcome the obstacle must make the roll.
It doesn't matter if he has the lowest ability in the group or doesn't even have the right skill.
He's stepped up to the plate and he's got to take a swing.
We may need to re-evaluate this rule due to the nature of PBF Alternatively, the group can discuss a plan to overcome the obstacle, and if the GM approves the plan, the Patrol Leader may delegate who tackles which part of the obstacle.
The delegation is also subject to GM approval.
Describe Your Action Once the obstacle has been set by the GM, the player who's going to make the test describes his character's actions.
How is he going to overcome the test?
A good description of your actions goes a long way toward earning rewards at the end of the session.
Two Types of Tests There are two types of tests, one with a fixed obstacle - "independent" - and one where the obstacle is generated by rolling against another player or the GM - "versus".
Independent Tests When making an independent test, grab as many dice as your ability or skill's rating and give them a roll.
Each die that comes up 4 or better counts.
We call those dice successes.
Dice that come up 3 or lower don't count.
If you roll a number of successes equal to or greater than the obstacle, you've passed the test!
Versus Tests Versus tests are the best way to quickly resolve any dispute between two parties in the game.
They're exciting and tense!
When fighting with, racing against, convincing, pushing or competing with another character in the game, you use versus tests.
Roll your ability or skill's rating as described under Independent Tests.
Same rules for successes.
In this case, you pass your test if your roll more successes than your opponent does.
If rolling against the GM, the GM always rolls first and shows the player his successes.
If rolling against another Mouse Guard player, the senior guardmouse rolls first and shows his results to his junior opponent.
Making and Breaking Ties It's possible to use your traits or fate points to create ties.
If a versus test is tied, there are three ways to break it.
They may be used in the following order: 1 A trait may be called upon to break a tie in your OPPONENT'S favor.
Tiebreaker Rolls A tiebreaker roll is a second versus test between the two opponents.
If a skill was used in the initial tied versus test, Will or Health must be rolled to break the tie.
If the skill is physical in nature, test Health.
If the skill is mental- or social-oriented, test Will.
If Health or Will was used in the initial tied roll, Nature must be used for the tiebreaker.
Animals, other than mice or weasels, always test their Nature, even in ties.
If there is a second tie, the GM wins the test.
Or if it's a player versus player test, the GM determines the winner and applies a https://festes.ru/board-game/the-chase-board-game-online.html or condition on the players involved.
Passed Tests If you passed the test, you've overcome and escaped unscathed!
You may describe your success or let the GM embellish your actions with a shiny glow.
You can describe your characters actions, or what they say, as well as what happens, and how the situation has changed.
Failed Tests If you do not roll successes equal to or greater than your obstacle, you've failed this test.
First off, the GM gets to control your character for a little bit.
He gets to describe how you've misstepped or overreached.
Game-wise, one of two things can then happen, and the GM gets to decide which one he wants: You can fail to overcome the obstacle and the GM can inject a twist into the game, or you can SUCCEED at ever games best board attempt but at a COST.
The GM can't apply both.
Complex Obstacles Sometimes an obstacle is too complicated to bypass with a single test.
The GM can declare that a number of abilities or skills must be tested in order to bypass the obstacle.
In this case, he can vary the obstacle number for the difficulty of the test for each ability.
They don't have to all be the same.
I Am Wise You may have your character use his varied experience to help himself on a test.
Wises are knowledge skills.
When testing a regular skill, you may call on one of your wises to help.
If the GM agrees that the wise is appropriate to the situation, you may add +1D to your skill test.
For example: "Hidey-hole-wise" can be added to my Nature when trying to escape a snake burrow, when searching an office for a secret room or when using Scout to find a bandit lair.
Gear Against Obstacles If a character has a piece of gear that's appropriate to a particular obstacle - a map, a sword, a bit of damning evidence - the GM may grant the character a +1D advantage to overcome the obstacle.
Teamwork Teamwork is important in this game.
Your patrol needs to work together to overcome the difficult obstacles in its path.
The group can come together and help the person who is making the test.
He makes the roll, the helpers give him dice.
In the game, the patrol acts as a team to overcome the obstacle.
In order to help, 3 conditions must be met: 1 The acting player must acknowledge and accept the help from his compatriots.
This probably needs to be adjusted for PBF 3 Any helping players must describe how they are helping.
How Can I Help?
Helping another character allows you to donate a +1D to the roll.
This is called a "helping die".
Abilities Can Always Help Abilities If Nature, Will, Health, Resources or Circles is being tested, anyone can help.
Skills and Wises Help Skills and Wises If a skill or wise is being tested, you must help with one of your own skills or wises.
Your help must be appropriate to the situation.
Help is situational; it must make sense to the players.
The GM is the final arbiter on who and what can and can't help.
You Reap What You Sow Everyone who donates a die of help for a test is then bound by the results of the roll.
If the test is successful, everyone shares in the benefits.
If the test is failed, all of the helping characters share a similar fate.
If a condition is applied as the result of a failed test, the the player who rolled suffers that condition.
The helping players suffer a lesser condition of the GM's choosing.
Note: You may NOT help another mouse with a Will or Health test for recovery.
Beginner's Luck Nature can read article used as a substitute for any ability or skill that you don't have See Tapping Nature later.
However, using Nature prevents the character from learning new skills.
If you'd like to learn a skill your character doesn't have, you shouldn't use your Nature.
Instead, use these Beginner's Luck rules.
read article a character does not have an appropriate skill for a test, he may roll his Check this out or Health in place of Nature.
Total up the dice for the ability, wises, help and gear.
Make the test using half that number, rounded up.
If the skill is physical, use Health.
If the skill is mental or social, use Will.
Note: If an ability is at zero due to injury or sickness, you cannot test it using Beginner's Luck.
Conflicts Obstacles are great for creating hurdles for the patrol to leap, walls for them to climb, and paths for them to navigate.
But sometimes those hurdles are not enough.
Sometimes a moment is so important, we need to stop and focus on it: intense fight scenes in which we follow every sword stroke, heated arguments in which the fur really flies or breakneck chases that leave us dizzy and breathless.
In the game, we use "conflicts" to create those intense, detailed situations.
These are the turning points of a story.
A conflict scene needs active opponents on at least two sides.
Each side must want something.
They have to have an immediate goal - something they want to fight for, convince you of or escape from, for example.
Procedure for Conflicts In a conflict, we make many tests, but how we make them is different.
In order to keep the game interesting, each side privately chooses three actions to represent their strategy.
Then these actions are played against each other and tests are made to determine the results.
Here are the steps of a conflict: 1 Decide the type of conflict 2 Determine participants and teams 3 State goals.
Write yours on your team's sheet 4 Roll for your starting disposition 5 Check participant's conditions.
Modify dispositions accordingly 6 Choose 3 actions https://festes.ru/board-game/deluxe-scrabble-board-games.html private.
The GM chooses his actions first.
The GM reveals his first.
Consult the Actions table to see how your actions interact.
Add any modifiers from gear or weapons.
If either side's disposition is reduced to 0, stop.
Same rules as above.
Repeat previous steps until someone has disposition of 0.
Now to break these steps down: Determine Type of Conflict A conflict can be an argument, fight, chase, or any other action scene.
Argument If you need to convince another character or get information from him, use an argument.
Actions in argument conflicts are bits of in-character dialogue.
We play out the argument, point by point.
Chase When trying to catch or follow another mouse or an animal, you can use a chase conflict.
In chases, we describe our actions in terms of running, hiding, ducking and doubling back.
Fight Sometimes a guardmouse has to resort to physical force or violence in order to do his duty.
Actions in a fight conflict are blow-by-blow description of strikes, blocks, counterstrikes, pushes, cool disarms, diving for cover and general rollin'-around-fightin'!
Negotiation If you'd like to have a big negotiation about the price of goods or commodities or the nature of a contract, use a negotiation conflict.
In a negotiation conflict, you haggle over the price, complain about or praise the quality, and throw up your hands and wave them about.
Journey Your patrol will sometimes be called upon to undertake a long, dangerous journey in harsh weather.
If the GM decides it is appropriate, he can engage you in a journey conflict.
Actions are described in terms of survivalism, willpower, fortitude, bad weather, mishaps and wilderness.
Speech You can use your Orator skill to convince a gathering of mice to follow your thinking, or debate a political adversary in public and convince the audience that you're right.
You're opponent in a speech conflict can be another speechmaker, competing for the attention of the crowd, or it can be a mouse in the crowd, representative of their views.
Actions in a speech conflict or debate involve using rhetoric.
We make the speeches!
War Occasionally, the towns go to war or the mice have to muster against a big animal threat.
Characters with the Militarist skill may lead other mice into battle.
Actions in wars are described as attacks, subtle feints, holding actions, daring field maneuvers and valiant defenses.
Participants Often when you get into a conflict, you have multiple players working together toward a goal.
Therefore, we break down the participants of the conflict into teams using the following guidelines: 1 1 or 2 players - always 1 team.
This is the optimal team size.
You're your own team.
There are all sorts of methods for deciding who joins a team, friends, cloak color, patrol-leader assigned.
Generally, though, you should try to pick teams that complement each other.
Spread your Orators and Fighters so that each team has one, for example.
In some cases, you may decide to join the GM's team and oppose the other players.
GM players, however, can only help the other players using the teamwork rules aiding with helping dice for disposition rolls and tests for mouse guard board game actions, for exampleand may not take actions.
You can also to choose to sit out of a conflict.
Conflict Goals Each team picks a short-term or immediate goal they wish to accomplish as a result of this conflict.
Conflict goals are similar to your character's session Goal.
Include a statement about your character, an action and a target.
Example: Saxon and Kenzie have been been captured by the oldfur Celanawe.
Celanawe accuses them of stealing his axe.
His goal: "You thieves will tell me what you've done with my axe!
Celanawe must help us stop them.
However, you've got to win with little or no compromise discussed later.
Starting Disposition To represent how strong your side's position is in this conflict, each team generates a number called "disposition".
This number represents your strength in the conflict.
A disposition of 3 or less is low; 4 to 6 is OK; 7 and higher is strong.
During the conflict, you use all of your wits, luck and good looks to reduce your opponent's disposition to zero.
If you can do that, you've won.
To generate your team's disposition for a conflict, consult the Conflict Type on the next page.
The player who initiated the conflict tests the listed skill for his team.
The other team members may help.
The obstacle for the test is 0.
Add the successes of that roll to the rating of the tester's base ability listed for the type of conflict: Argument: Persuader skill + Will Chase: Scout + Health or Nature Fight: Fighter + Health or Nature Fight Animal: Fighter or Hunter + Health or Nature Journey: Pathfinder + Health Negotiation: Haggler + Will Speech: Orator + Will War: Militarist + Will Other: Attack + GM's discretion The seniormost mouse in the team should make a note of that number in the disposition shield next to the Conflict Goal on the back of his character sheet.
Note: Make sure to check your character's condition, traits and gear for modifiers to starting disposition!
Actions To play out the tense, tactical nature of a conflict, we use a specific structure.
Each team chooses three actions from the following list in advance: 1 Attack 2 Defend 3 Feint 4 Maneuver Each action has a different effect on how you test.
And each action interacts with the other actions in a different way.
Actions are chosen in sets of three, then revealed one at a time.
Once everyone's actions are revealed, we play out the interaction - roleplay and make tests.
Once everyone has picked, the GM or opposing player reveals his first action.
And then any subsequent teams.
Then the actions are resolved according the matrix below.
Actions 2 and 3 are resolved in the same way.
Make sure to roleplay your characters as they take their actions, and then roll the test dice.
Note: The four actions are abstract and can be applied to nearly any type of conflict.
You get to interpret them and make sure they fit the situation in the game.
Attack The Attack action lets you take a shot at your goal.
In a fight, this means whacking away at the enemy, or filling him full of arrows.
In an argument, this means making a strong, direct point.
In a chase, it means sprinting for the finish.
In a negotiation, an Attack exposes your opponent's weaknesses.
Attack reduces your opponent's disposition by the margin of success.
When used against an opponent's Attack or Feint action, it's an "Independent" 0 test, meaning you roll and however many successes you have reduce the opponents disposition by that number.
When used against an opponent's Defend or Maneuver, it's a "Versus" test.
Meaning that you compare the number please click for source successes against your opponent's number of successes.
Whoever has mouse guard board game reduces their opponent's disposition by the difference.
Defend The Defend action protects and strengthens your position.
In a fight, this can mean blocking your enemy's weapon.
In an argument, it can represent an excellent rebuttal.
In a chase, a Defend action can represent carefully picking a path or covering your tracks.
Defend played against Attack or Maneuver is a versus test.
Against another Defend, the actions are independent 3 tests.
When played against a Feint, Defend may not test.
Defend stops or reduces the effectiveness of Attack and Maneuver actions.
If Defend successes are greater than the versus action, add the margin of success to your disposition.
Disposition cannot go higher than the starting total.
Feint A Feint represents a sneak attack.
It's dangerous to try, but if it works, it's very effective.
In a fight, a Feint is a feint!
In an argument, it's a misleading point used to get your opponent to say something foolish that you can use against him.
Feint is a special attack.
If played against Defend, the Defender may not test.
The Feinter makes an Independent 0 test; your target's disposition is reduced by your margin of success.
If played against an Attack, the Feinting player may not attack or defend.
If played against another Feint, make a versus test.
The margin of success is subtracted from the loser's disposition.
If played against Maneuver, test Feint at Ob 0.
Successes are removed from your opponent's disposition.
Maneuver The Maneuver action is used to, well, maneuver, gaining an advantage over your opponent.
In a fight, a Maneuver can be a push or a flanking move.
The Maneuver action is used to gain a temporary advantage over your opponent.
It's the most complex action of the four.
The Maneuver action has 3 possible effects: impede, gain position and disarm.
Each effect requires mouse guard board game certain margin of success.
You can't use the same effect twice on the same action, but you can use an effect again if you play another successful Maneuver on a subsequent action.
Played against Attack or Defend, Maneuver is a versus test.
Played against Feint or another Maneuver, the Maneuver is tested independently 0.
Margin of success is applied to the effects described below: Margin of success 1: Impede: -1D disadvantage to your opponent's next action.
This is applied to the character making the test next action if there are multiple players on the opposing team s.
Margin of success 2: Gain Posision: +2D advantage to your next action.
Again, this applies only to the player making the test next action.
Margin of success 3: Disarm: Remove one of your opponent's weapons, a piece of gear or disable a trait for the remainder of the conflict.
Alternately, if you win by a margin of success of 3, you may impede AND gain position.
Here's a matrix of the actions and what types of tests against other:.
I Which Skill Do I Use?
Each type of conflict uses a different skill set.
Two players alternate back and forth.
Three players each get one action out of the set of three.
No player on a team can take two actions in a row.
Make sure the player taking the action has the appropriate here for that action.
Because once it's set, that player is doing the test regardless.
This needs to be decided before the GM reveals his first action.
Winning, Losing and Tying a Conflict If you reduce your opponent's disposition to zero you win the conflict and achieve your goal.
However, if you lost points from your own disposition, you have to compromise with the loser.
If your disposition is reduced to zero while your opponent has points left, you have lost.
You do not accomplish your goal as stated.
If both sides are reduced to zero disposition in the same action, the conflict is a tie.
Both sides accomplish their goals.
This is a very dangerous outcome!
Compromise If you lost, but took points off your opponent's disposition, he must offer you a compromise.
Compromises are like twists, but in this case they are the result of the whole conflict, not just a failed roll.
And players also get to introduce compromises, not just the GM.
Once the conflict has ended, the first thing you do is compromise.
The loser makes an offer to the winner, "Fine, you win, but.
The results of a conflict are set - the winner achieved his goal, the loser did not.
Now discuss an appropriate middle ground for the compromise.
The whole group must decide if the compromise is appropriate.
If everyone complains that the compromise is too much or inappropriate, the loser can change the terms.
If no consensus can be reached, the GM can approve the compromise or ask the loser to modify his terms.
There are 3 grades to compromises - a minor compromise, a compromise and a major compromise.
Minor Compromise If the winner lost less than half his disposition, he owes the loser a minor compromise.
The loser may ask for a small part of his goal or something related to it.
Minor compromises can be used to set up a follow-up conflict or to apply changes to the winner's condition angry, or tired, for exampleand that would apply to all the members of the team.
Compromise: Lost About Half If the winner comes out of the conflict with only half of his disposition, he owes the loser a significant concession.
The loser doesn't get his goal, but imagine he got halfway there.
Or the loser could accept defeat, but introduce a new, unforeseen complication that has arisen due to the winner's victory.
This is how a player creates a twist.
Alternately, the loser could offer a compromise in which he gets nothing, but the winner only got halfway to his goal.
Good luck convincing the winner to agree.
Major Compromise: Read more All but a Few If the winner's disposition is reduced to just a few points, he has won a very narrow victory indeed.
He must grant a major compromise to the loser.
Imagine the loser nearly accomplished his goal, but was only thwarted at the end.
What would that look like?
Or what major new twist could be introduced because of this victory?
Compromises can be used to extract promises, change the way a character feels about you, or throw a wrench in the works.
They can be used to hurt your enemy, too.
But you can't use a compromise to accomplish your conflict goal.
If you didn't win, you don't get your goal.
Surrender You may surrender during a conflict.
The surrendering player hands total victory to his opponent.
There is no compromise.
If at all possible, a challenge should be played out to its conclusion.
Players who are losing should fight for a compromise.
Gear for Conflicts Fighting Weapons Axe Deadly: +1s after a successful Attack.
Slow: -1D to Defend or Feint Bow Missile: Against short-ranged weapons, your Attack action counts as a versus action rather than independent against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Long Range: +2D to Maneuver against normal, spear or thrown weapons.
Hard to Defend: Add +1D to your Attack versus Defend.
Halberd Versatile: Halberds are versatile polearms.
They can be used either as a spear or an axe in order to use that weapon's qualities.
Choose which mode you're using before announcing your first action.
Hook and Line Hooked: +1D to Maneuver, +1s after a successful maneuver.
Unwieldy: -1D to Attack.
Knife Short and Quick: Any successful Maneuver when fighting with a knife, against a spear, thrown or missle weapon counts as the disarm effect.
This effect happens in addition to your margin of success for the maneuver action.
Thrown: When throwing a knife against a spear or normal weapon, your Attack action counts as versus against an opponents Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Once you throw your knife, it's gone!
Shield Protection: +2D to Defend.
Heavy: -1D Health to recover from fatigue if the shield was used in a fight during the last Turn.
Shields are generally used on their own - as defense and a weapon.
Sling Missile: Against shorter-ranged weapons, your Attack action counts as a versus action rather than independent against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Medium Range: +1D to Maneuver.
Spear Spear: Your Attack action counts as a versus action against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
This only applies against spears and normal weapons.
The spear also gets a +1D to Maneuver actions against normal weapons.
Staff Handy: +1D to Feint actions.
May also be thrown.
When throwing a staff, your Attack action counts as a versus action against an opponent's Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
This only applies against spears and normal weapons.
Also, once you throw your staff, it's gone!
Sword Useful: +1D to one action of your choice in a fight.
You may choose the action at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the fight.
Note: If you have multiple weapons, you must choose a single weapon for a set of 3 actions.
Armor Armor must be worn at all times in order to provide the benefits.
Armor worn during the previous Turn imposes a penalty to recover from the Tired condition.
Light Armor +1D to your disposition roll for the fight.
Heavy: -1D to Health tests to resist fatigue.
Heavy Armor +1s to your disposition roll in a fight.
Clumsy: -1D to Maneuver tests.
Heavy: -1D to Health tests to resist fatigue.
Weapons of Wit Weapons of wit are "weapons" you can use in an argument or speech.
These are mostly roleplaying cues.
They give you guidelines on what to say and how to say it.
Intimidation or Deception +1s to a successful Feint or Maneuver.
The intimidation or lie must be played out to gain the benefit.
Evidence +1s after a successful Attack.
If the character has pre-established evidence to support, he can mouse guard board game it and explain it on his Attack actions to gain benefit.
Roleplay The roleplay bonus is granted to players who deliver their lines in character.
Add +1D to one action of your choice in the argument or speech.
You may choose at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the argument.
If playing in a team, it sicks to that action for the team, not just the character.
Promises +1D to Defend.
If you make promises to the other side, you can gain this benefit.
The promises aren't binding unless they come back to haunt you in the compromise.
Repeating Yourself -1D to any action.
If you repeat the same points over and over, you're weakening your side.
You suffer a penalty for repetition.
Military Weapons Military weapons are materials, organizations or tactics that the military leader must acquire, muster or devise before the battle.
You can't make these up on the fly!
Cut to the Chase If you're playing out a chase conflict, you can use the following effects to gain advantages.
They are essentially "weapons" for a chase.
Locals or Smart Mice +1D to one action of your choice in the chase.
You may choose to apply the bonus at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the chase.
Mice who are chasing around their home turf earn this bonus.
Also, mice who have a wise appropriate to the terrain or locale may also take the bonus.
Maps +1D to the disposition roll.
Maps help you plan your escape better, but they don't help much in the heat of the moment.
There's little time to consult them once the chase is on.
Dirty Tricks +1s to a successful Feint.
Dirty tricks like tripwires, sand in the face or mouse guard board game a rock to the back of the head earn you the element of surprise.
The dirty trick must be described by the action player.
Dirty tricks can be invented on the click to see more or set in advance.
Right Tools for the Job +1s to Attack.
If your team is equipped for the terrain and weather, you earn an advantage.
Equipment like a rope, a ladder, camouflaged netting, snow shoes, skis or a boat can all be used to earn this bonus.
It's dependent on the situation.
If you're going to play this game, reading this is a fantastic primer.
Thanks to the author.
Thanks for this entire thread!
Quite well written and it has provided clearer help than Ive found elsewhere so I can run a Mouse Guard game.
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A light strategy game for two players, from the setting of the Mouse Guard comics and roleplaying game. Each player control four mouse pawns on a gridded board. Play involves a deck containing three types of cards: Swords, Strongholds, and Diplomacy.


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MouseGuard by David Petersen
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A two-player board game from the Mouse Guard comics—for guardmice, patrons of the June Alley Inn and their fans.
Recently, he asked Luke Crane of and the Mouse Guard RPG to come up with some monopoly board online play for the game and so we did!
We developed a light strategy game for two players that takes 10 to 20 minutes time per game.
It's exactly the sweet spot we hoped for—a game you can play while you're sitting at the June Alley Inn listening to tales, or when you're waiting for your friends to arrive for a game night, or when you're waiting in long lines mouse guard board game comicons!
After he depicted the game in the comics, David created a prototype based on his drawings.
This is what we started with for the game design.
The game has a wooden gridded board, four mouse pawns for each player and a deck of sword, stronghold and diplomacy cards.
After we created the initial rules, we sent out a print and play version to our friends and fans to play test for us.
Notably, Scott and Rym from the gave it a good thrashing for us.
We want to do mouse guard board game small production run with high quality components for Mouse Guard fans everywhere and we need your help to do it.
We'd much rather show this game to you so you can tell mouse guard board game what you think than gamble on printing off a bunch and shipping them straight into distribution.
David and I love our fans and we want you to be a part of making this game.
The game will be contained in a cardboard two piece box with a full color wrap.
A few lucky backers can acquire some of David's original art for the game.
We're offering, individually, the face of each card and the card back.
Each piece is 4.
The original inks mouse guard board game the cover are 8.
It's a unique piece by David, since his typical pieces are character commissions and comic art.
Risks and challenges This game will be published by The Burning Wheel.
I've published over a dozen titles through Burning Wheel, including a boxed set game, but this will be our first board game.
Making board games can be hard!
Pick up your copy at the con if it's ready!
Pick up your copy at the con if it's mouse guard board game />Pick up your copy at the con if it's ready!
You'll also receive a print and play version of the game.
You'll also receive a print and play version of the game.
A deluxe version of the game with a hardwood board, cast metal mouse pawns and fancy cards all kept in a wooden, felt-lined mouse guard board game and a signed copy of the game.

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Why Mouse Guard Is In My Board Game Closet I recently have been reading up on Mouse Guard and bought my first copy just a few short months ago. I had no idea what to expect because I had never read the comics myself (I am more of a Redwell man) but I ended up very pleased with how the setting came out completely unique and well thought out.


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The celebrated, long-running comic series Mouse Guard is finally getting a movie thanks to the folks at 20th Century Fox who have recruited The Maze Runner franchise director Wes Ball to bring the.


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Mouse Guard: Swords & Strongholds by Burning Wheel — Kickstarter
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Mice and Mystics is a deeply story driven game. Players play through the chapters of a Mice and Mystics storybook, taking on the roles of mouse adventurers as their story unfolds. This box set is stuffed with everything you need to go on the first adventure with Prince Collin and his allies.


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MouseGuard by David Petersen
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The Board Game Kaptain welcomes you to his channel. Show less Read more. Mouse Guard Roleplaying Boxed set second edition review - Duration: 27 minutes. The Board Game Kaptain.


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Rewards You earn rewards for the way you play your board game amazon in a session.
Rewards are accrued in points.
These points are used to modify dice rolls.
There are two types of point: fate points and persona points.
Rewards are distributed at the end of a session.
When play has ended, go around the table.
Each player in turn reads his Belief, Goal and Instinct.
If the group agrees that the criteria below are met, then the applicable reward is earned.
Fate Points There are three ways to earn fate points.
You may earn up to 3 fate points in one session.
You may earn up to 4 in one session.
Can be awarded to more than one player, but not to every player The Mission A mission will be introduced by the Game Master GM and will include the following elements: 1 Season of the year.
This can affect weather - which can also have a big impact on game play.
After the mission is introduced, the players will write down their mission Goal s on their character sheet.
It's easy to simply write the mission as your current Goal.
After awhile, though, that's going to get boring.
Fortunately, Goals are versatile.
You have a lot of leeway; you don't have to stick strictly to the mission.
Look at your Goals as a group: One player should always have a Goal about completing the mission.
You can color that with conditions or stipulations - how will he complete the Goal?
Other players can have: a Goal about another member of your patrol, a Goal board game power grid strategy seeing something or retrieving something from the wii balance games fun board you're going.
If you're family, mentor, friend or enemy is located near the mission objective, write a Goal about them.
Some examples: "I will mouse guard board game Kenzie and Lieam on this patrol.
article source without these tests, how does a mouse truly become a hero?
The GM's Turn There are 2 turns in a game session.
The GM's turn and then the Player's turn.
During the GM's turn, it's his job to beat the crap out of the players.
Well, their characters anyway.
Initially, the GM may provide options to overcome obstacles due to the inexperience of the players.
During the course of overcoming these obstacles, the mice may be inflicted with various conditions such as Hunger, Anger, Exhaustion, Injuries or Sickness.
A 'test' is a roll of the dice.
There are 3 kinds of obstacles guardsmice may face: 1 Simple obstacles - which usually only require 1 test.
If the player succeeds in testing against the obstacle, they get what they want which is usually to overcome the obstacleand the player and the GM can provide a little go here of color commentary about the achievement to celebrate the moment.
If the player fails, one of two things can happen: 1 The GM can decide that the obstacle was insurmountable, and can throw an unexpected twist into the story as a result, or 2 The GM can allow you to overcome the obstacle, but will apply a condition to the mouse tired, angry, etc.
In either case, the GM gets to describe the scene and what happens.
The Players' Role During the GM's Turn During the confrontation of these obstacles, the players will describe their character's reactions and actions as they attempt the tests.
The GM will evaluate the suggested course of action and will may set an obstacle number against which the player will need to test more on this later.
Players can use their traits to either help or hinder them when making these tests.
Incorporating a trait in a beneficial way will add bonus dice or even rerolls.
Using a trait against yourself, earns the player 'checks' which can be spent during the Players' Turn.
Checks are very valuable and useful.
It's your job to be proactive about earning them.
A hero risks himself to overcome his own weaknesses and improve the common good with his sacrifice.
Sometimes during the GM's turn, disagreements may arise amongst the players.
These disagreements can be resolved using in-game conflict test mechanics.
The GM's turn ends under one of three circumstances: 1 The patrol has completed its mission.
The play is then turned over to the Players for the Player's Turn.
The Players' Turn It's the GM's job to beat the crap out of your guardmice.
It's your job to survive the beating and overcome!
During the Players' Turn you may try to recover a bit and build up your resources in addition to taking care of other, miscellaneous business.
Checks and Tests Tests in the Players' Turn are limited.
Each player gets one free test.
You can use it for whatever you want - to recover, to find an old friend, to fashion new armor, to pick a fight or buy a gift for your love.
If you want more tests, you must spend the checks you earned against your traits in the GM's turn.
So remember, when you use your traits to get in your way during the GM's turn, it gives you of board game target options to do more stuff in the Players' Turn.
When you've run out of checks, you're done for this turn.
Note 1: You cannot spend a check for a test twice in a row.
Note 2: You can donate checks to other players.
Note 3: Each player takes a turn spending 1 check at a board for learning />As soon as any player runs out of checks during a specific round, any players that haven't yet gone that round can finish, and then the Players' Turn is over.
Any excess checks are discarded.
Recover You may use a check to attempt to recover from one or more of your conditions Hungry, Angry, etc.
This will involve rolling a test more on this later.
Regroup You can make tests against your Resources value for things like equipment to help you continue.
Or against your Circles value to find help or allies, or against your craft skill to create useful items.
Picking Fights and Stuff You can also get into full-blown conflicts with fellow players' mice, your relationship characters or characters the GM has introduced.
It only costs one check to start a conflict.
Your victim doesn't have to spend anything to fight back.
Note: You may not use your traits against yourself to earn more checks during the Players' Turn GM's Role in the Players' Turn The GM doesn't get to sit around during the Players' Turn and just watch.
He has 3 very important duties: prompt the players with the rules, play the relationships and stay involved.
Obstacles In this game, an obstacle is broken down into 3 parts: 1 A description by the GM.
For example: To cross a frigid stream 1requires the characters to pass an obstacle 3 2 Health test 3.
To pass a test, you need a number of successes equal to or greater than the obstacles difficulty.
Successes are counted for each 4, 5 or 6 of each die rolled.
For example: Using the example above, if your Health ability is 5, you would get to roll 5 dice.
And you would need 3 successes to overcome that test because of it's rating.
Tests A test refers to a roll of the dice for a single ability or skill.
You make tests to overcome obstacles.
Who Makes the Test?
The player to volunteer first or think of the plan to overcome the obstacle must make the roll.
It doesn't matter if he has the lowest ability in the group or doesn't even have the right skill.
He's stepped up to the plate and he's got to take a swing.
We may need to re-evaluate this rule due to the nature of PBF Alternatively, the group can discuss a plan to overcome the obstacle, and if the GM approves the plan, the Patrol Leader may delegate who tackles which part of the obstacle.
The delegation is also subject to GM approval.
Describe Your Action Once the obstacle has been set by the GM, the player who's going to make the test describes his character's actions.
How is he going to overcome the test?
A good description of your actions goes a long way toward earning rewards at the end of the session.
Two Types of Tests There are two types of tests, one with a fixed obstacle - "independent" - and one where the obstacle is generated by rolling against another player or the GM - "versus".
Independent Tests When making an independent test, grab as many dice as your ability or skill's rating and give them a roll.
Each die that comes up 4 or better counts.
We call those dice successes.
Dice that come up 3 or lower don't count.
If you roll a number of successes equal to or greater than the obstacle, you've passed the test!
Versus Tests Versus tests are the best way to quickly resolve any dispute between two parties in the game.
They're exciting and tense!
When fighting with, racing against, convincing, pushing or competing with another character in the game, you use versus tests.
Roll your ability or skill's rating as described under Independent Tests.
Same rules for successes.
In this case, you pass your test if your roll more successes than your opponent does.
If rolling against the GM, the GM always rolls first and shows the player his successes.
If rolling against another Mouse Guard player, the senior guardmouse rolls first and shows his results to his junior opponent.
Making and Breaking Ties It's possible to use your traits or fate points to create ties.
If a versus test is tied, there are three ways to break it.
They may be used in the following order: 1 A trait may be called upon to break a tie in your OPPONENT'S favor.
Tiebreaker Rolls A tiebreaker roll is a second versus test between the two opponents.
If a skill was used in the initial tied versus test, Will or Health must be rolled to break the tie.
If the skill is physical in nature, test Health.
If the skill is mental- or social-oriented, test Will.
If Health or Will was used in the initial tied roll, Nature must be used for the tiebreaker.
Animals, other than mice or weasels, always test their Nature, even in ties.
If there is a second tie, the GM wins the test.
Or if it's a player versus player test, the GM determines the winner and applies a twist or condition on the players involved.
Passed Tests If you passed the test, you've overcome and escaped unscathed!
You may describe your success or let the GM embellish your actions with a shiny glow.
You can describe your characters actions, or what they say, as well as what happens, and how the situation has changed.
Failed Tests If you do not roll successes equal to or greater than your obstacle, you've failed this test.
First off, the GM gets to control your character for a little bit.
He gets to describe how you've misstepped or overreached.
Game-wise, one of two things can then happen, and the GM gets to decide which one he wants: You can fail to overcome the obstacle and the GM can inject a twist into the game, or you can SUCCEED at your attempt but at a COST.
The GM can't apply both.
Complex Obstacles Sometimes an obstacle is too complicated to bypass with a single test.
The GM can declare that a number of abilities or skills must be tested in order to bypass the obstacle.
In this case, he can vary the obstacle number for the difficulty of the test for each ability.
They don't have to all be the same.
I Am Wise You may have your character use his varied experience to help himself on a test.
Wises are knowledge skills.
When testing a regular skill, you may call on one of your wises to help.
If the GM agrees that the wise is appropriate to the situation, you may add +1D to your skill test.
For example: "Hidey-hole-wise" can be added to my Nature when trying to escape a snake burrow, when searching an office for a secret room or when using Scout to find a bandit lair.
Gear Against Obstacles If a character has a piece of gear that's appropriate to a particular obstacle - a map, a sword, a bit of damning evidence - the GM may grant the character a +1D advantage to overcome the obstacle.
Teamwork Teamwork is important in this game.
Your patrol needs to work together to overcome the difficult obstacles in its path.
The group can come together and help the person who is making the test.
He makes the roll, the helpers give him dice.
In the game, the patrol acts as a team to overcome the obstacle.
In order to help, 3 conditions must be met: 1 The acting player must acknowledge and accept the help from his compatriots.
This probably needs to be adjusted for PBF 3 Any helping players must describe how they are helping.
How Can I Help?
Helping another character allows you to donate a +1D to the roll.
This is called a "helping die".
Abilities Can Always Help Abilities If Nature, Will, Health, Resources or Circles is being tested, anyone can help.
Skills and Wises Help Skills and Wises If a skill or wise is being tested, you must help with one of your pity, haunted house board game online like skills or wises.
Your help must be appropriate to the situation.
Help is situational; it must make sense to the players.
The GM is the final arbiter on who and what can and can't help.
You Reap What You Sow Everyone who donates a die of help for a test is then bound by the results of the roll.
If the test is successful, everyone shares in the benefits.
If the test is failed, all of the helping characters share a similar fate.
If a condition is applied as the result of a failed test, the the player who rolled suffers that condition.
The helping players suffer a lesser condition of the GM's choosing.
Note: You may NOT help another mouse with a Will or Health test for recovery.
Beginner's Luck Nature can be used as a substitute for any ability or skill that you don't have See Tapping Nature later.
However, using Nature prevents the character from learning new skills.
If you'd like to learn a skill your character doesn't have, you shouldn't use your Nature.
Instead, use these Beginner's Luck rules.
If click the following article character does not have an appropriate skill for a test, he may roll his Mouse guard board game or Health in place of Nature.
Total up the dice for the ability, wises, help and gear.
Make the test using half that number, rounded up.
If the skill is physical, use Health.
If the skill is just click for source or social, use Will.
Note: If an ability is at zero due to injury or sickness, you cannot test it using Beginner's Luck.
Conflicts Obstacles are great for creating hurdles for the patrol to leap, walls for them to climb, and paths for them to navigate.
But sometimes those hurdles are not enough.
Sometimes a moment is so important, we need to stop and focus on it: intense fight scenes in which we follow every sword stroke, heated arguments in which the fur really flies or breakneck chases that leave us dizzy and breathless.
In the game, we use "conflicts" to create those intense, detailed situations.
These are the turning points of a story.
A conflict scene needs active opponents on at least two sides.
Each side must want something.
They have to have an immediate goal - something they want to fight for, convince you of or escape from, for example.
Procedure for Conflicts In a conflict, we make many tests, but how we make them is different.
In order to keep the game interesting, each side privately chooses three actions to represent their strategy.
Then these actions are played against each other and tests are made to determine the results.
Here are the steps of a conflict: 1 Decide the type of conflict 2 Determine participants and teams 3 State goals.
Write yours on your team's sheet 4 Roll for your starting disposition 5 Check participant's conditions.
Modify dispositions accordingly 6 Choose 3 actions in private.
The GM chooses his actions first.
The GM reveals his first.
Consult the Actions table to see how your actions interact.
Add any modifiers from gear or weapons.
If either side's disposition is reduced to 0, stop.
Same rules as above.
Repeat previous steps until someone has disposition of 0.
Now to break these steps down: Determine Type of Conflict A conflict can be an argument, fight, chase, or any other action scene.
Argument If you need to convince another character or get information from him, use an argument.
Actions in argument conflicts are bits of in-character dialogue.
We play out the argument, point by point.
Chase When trying to catch or follow another mouse or an animal, you can use a chase conflict.
In chases, we describe our actions in terms of running, hiding, ducking and doubling back.
Fight Sometimes a guardmouse has to resort to physical force or violence in order to do his duty.
Actions in a fight conflict are blow-by-blow description of strikes, blocks, counterstrikes, pushes, cool disarms, diving for cover and general rollin'-around-fightin'!
Negotiation If you'd like to have a big negotiation about the price of goods or commodities or the nature of a contract, use a negotiation conflict.
In a negotiation conflict, you haggle over the price, complain about or praise the quality, and throw up your hands and wave them about.
Journey Your patrol will sometimes be called upon to undertake a long, dangerous journey in harsh weather.
If the GM decides it is appropriate, he can engage you in a journey conflict.
Actions are described in terms of survivalism, willpower, fortitude, bad weather, mishaps and wilderness.
Speech You can use your Orator skill to convince a gathering of mice to follow your thinking, or debate a political adversary in public and convince the audience that you're right.
You're opponent in a speech conflict can be another speechmaker, competing for the attention of the crowd, or it can be a mouse in the crowd, representative of their views.
Actions in a speech conflict or debate involve using rhetoric.
We make the speeches!
War Occasionally, the towns go to war or the mice have to muster against a big animal threat.
Characters with the Militarist skill may lead other mice into battle.
Actions in wars are described as attacks, subtle feints, holding actions, daring field maneuvers and valiant defenses.
Participants Often when you get into a conflict, you have multiple players working together toward a goal.
Therefore, we break down the participants of the conflict into teams using the following guidelines: 1 1 or 2 players - always 1 team.
This is the optimal team size.
You're your own team.
There are all sorts of methods for deciding who joins a team, friends, cloak color, patrol-leader assigned.
Generally, though, you should try to pick teams that complement each other.
Spread your Orators and Fighters so that each team has one, for example.
In some cases, you may decide to join the GM's team and oppose the other players.
GM players, however, can only help the other players using the teamwork rules aiding with helping dice for disposition rolls and tests for certain actions, for exampleand may not take actions.
You can also to choose to sit out of a conflict.
Conflict Goals Each team picks a short-term or immediate goal they wish to accomplish as a result of this conflict.
Conflict goals are similar to your character's session Goal.
Include a statement about your character, an action and a target.
Example: Saxon and Kenzie have been been captured by the oldfur Celanawe.
Celanawe accuses them of stealing his axe.
His goal: "You thieves will tell me what you've done with my axe!
Celanawe must help us stop them.
However, you've got to win with little or no compromise discussed later.
Starting Disposition To represent how strong your side's position is in this conflict, each team generates a number called "disposition".
This number represents your strength in this web page conflict.
A disposition of 3 or less is low; 4 to 6 is OK; 7 and higher is strong.
During the conflict, you use all of your wits, luck and good looks to reduce your opponent's disposition to zero.
If you can do that, you've won.
To generate your team's disposition for a conflict, consult the Conflict Type on the next page.
The player who initiated the conflict tests the listed skill for his team.
The other team members may help.
The obstacle for the test is 0.
Add the successes of that roll to the rating of the tester's base ability listed for the type of conflict: Argument: Persuader skill + Will Chase: Scout + Health or Nature Fight: Fighter + Health or Nature Fight Animal: Fighter or Hunter + Health or Nature Journey: Pathfinder + Health Negotiation: Haggler + Will Speech: Orator + Will War: Militarist + Will Other: Attack + GM's discretion The seniormost mouse in the team should make a note of that number in the disposition shield next to the Conflict Goal on the back of his character sheet.
Note: Make sure to check your character's condition, traits and gear for modifiers to starting disposition!
Actions To play out the tense, tactical nature of a conflict, we use a specific structure.
Each team chooses three actions from the following list in advance: 1 Attack 2 Defend 3 Feint 4 Maneuver Each action has a different effect on how you test.
And each action source with the other actions in a different way.
Actions are chosen in sets of three, then revealed one at a time.
Once everyone's actions are revealed, we play out the interaction - roleplay and make tests.
Once everyone has picked, the GM or opposing player reveals his first action.
And then any subsequent teams.
Then the actions are resolved according the matrix below.
Actions 2 and 3 are resolved in the same way.
Make sure to roleplay your characters as they take their actions, and then roll the test dice.
Note: The four actions are abstract and can be applied to nearly any type of conflict.
You get to interpret them and make sure they fit the situation in the game.
Attack The Attack action lets you take a shot at your goal.
In a fight, this means whacking away at the enemy, or filling him full of arrows.
In an argument, this means making a strong, direct point.
In a chase, it means sprinting for the finish.
In a negotiation, an Attack exposes your opponent's weaknesses.
Attack reduces your opponent's disposition by the margin of success.
When used against an opponent's Attack or Feint action, it's an "Independent" 0 test, meaning you roll and however many successes you have reduce the opponents disposition by that number.
When used against an opponent's Defend or Maneuver, it's a "Versus" test.
Meaning that you compare the number of successes against your opponent's number of successes.
Whoever has board games similar to family feud reduces their https://festes.ru/board-game/facebook-multiplayer-board-games-ipad-free.html disposition by the difference.
Defend The Defend action protects and strengthens your position.
In a fight, this can mean blocking your enemy's weapon.
In an argument, it can represent an excellent rebuttal.
In a chase, a Defend action can represent carefully picking a path or covering your tracks.
Defend played against Attack or Maneuver is a versus test.
Against another Defend, the actions are independent 3 tests.
When played against a Feint, Defend may not test.
Defend stops or reduces the effectiveness of Attack and Maneuver actions.
If Defend successes are greater than the versus action, add the margin of success to your disposition.
Disposition cannot go higher than the starting total.
Feint A Feint represents a sneak attack.
It's dangerous to try, but if it works, it's very effective.
In a fight, a Feint is a feint!
In an argument, it's a misleading point used to get your opponent to say something foolish that you can use against him.
Feint is a special attack.
If played against Mouse guard board game, the Defender may not test.
The Feinter makes an Independent 0 test; your target's disposition is reduced by your margin of success.
If played against an Attack, the Feinting player may not attack or defend.
If played against another Feint, make a versus test.
The margin of success is subtracted from the loser's disposition.
If played against Maneuver, test Feint at Ob 0.
Successes are removed from your opponent's disposition.
Maneuver The Maneuver action is used to, well, maneuver, gaining an advantage over your opponent.
In a fight, a Maneuver can be a push or a flanking move.
The Maneuver action is used to gain a temporary advantage over your opponent.
It's the most complex action of the four.
The Maneuver action has 3 possible effects: impede, gain position and disarm.
Each effect requires a certain margin of success.
You can't use the same effect twice on the same action, but you can use an effect again if you play another successful Maneuver on a subsequent action.
Played against Attack or Defend, Maneuver is a versus test.
Played against Feint or another Maneuver, the Maneuver is tested independently 0.
Margin of success is applied to the effects described below: Margin of success 1: Impede: -1D disadvantage to your opponent's next action.
This is applied to the character making the test next action if there are multiple players on the opposing team s.
Margin of success 2: Gain Posision: +2D advantage to your next action.
Again, this applies only to the player making the test next action.
Margin of success 3: Disarm: Remove one of your opponent's weapons, a piece of gear or disable a trait for the remainder please click for source the conflict.
Alternately, if you win by a margin of success of 3, you may impede AND gain position.
Here's a matrix of the actions and what types of tests against other:.
I Which Skill Do I Use?
Each type of conflict uses a different skill set.
Two players alternate back and forth.
Three players each get one action out of the set of three.
No player on a team can take two actions in a row.
Make sure the player taking the action has the appropriate skill for that action.
Because once it's set, that player is doing the test regardless.
This needs to be decided before the GM reveals his first action.
Winning, Losing and Tying a Conflict If you reduce your opponent's disposition to zero you win the conflict and achieve your goal.
However, if you lost points from your own disposition, you have to compromise with the loser.
If your disposition is reduced to zero while your opponent has points left, you have lost.
You do not accomplish your goal as stated.
If both sides are reduced to zero disposition in the same action, the conflict is a tie.
Both sides accomplish their goals.
This is a very dangerous outcome!
Compromise If you lost, but took points off your opponent's disposition, he must offer you a compromise.
Compromises are like twists, but in this case they are the result of the whole conflict, not just a failed roll.
And players also get to introduce compromises, not just the GM.
Once the conflict has ended, the first thing you do is compromise.
The loser makes an offer to the winner, "Fine, you win, but.
The results of a conflict are set - the winner achieved his goal, the loser did not.
Now discuss an appropriate middle ground for the compromise.
The whole group must decide if the compromise is appropriate.
If everyone complains that the compromise is too much or inappropriate, the loser can change the terms.
If no consensus can be reached, the GM can approve the compromise or ask the loser to modify his terms.
There are 3 grades to compromises - a minor compromise, a compromise and a major compromise.
Minor Compromise If the winner lost less than half his disposition, he owes the loser a minor compromise.
The loser may ask for a small part of his goal or something related to it.
Minor compromises can be used to set up a follow-up conflict or to apply changes to the winner's condition angry, or tired, for exampleand that would apply to all the members of the team.
Compromise: Lost About Half If the winner comes out of the conflict with only half of his disposition, he owes the loser a significant concession.
The loser doesn't get his goal, but imagine he got halfway there.
Or the loser could accept defeat, but introduce a new, unforeseen complication that has arisen due to the winner's victory.
This is how a player creates a twist.
Alternately, the loser could offer a compromise in which he gets nothing, but the winner only got halfway to his goal.
Good luck convincing the winner to agree.
Major Mouse guard board game Lost All but a Few If the winner's disposition is reduced to just a few points, he has won a very narrow victory indeed.
He must grant a major compromise to the loser.
Imagine treasure of the lost pyramid board game loser nearly accomplished his goal, but was only thwarted at the end.
What would that look like?
Or what major new twist could be introduced because of this victory?
Compromises can be used to extract promises, change the way a character feels about you, or throw a wrench in the works.
They can be used to hurt your enemy, too.
But you can't use a compromise to accomplish your conflict goal.
If you didn't win, you don't get your goal.
Surrender You may surrender during a conflict.
The surrendering player hands total victory to his opponent.
There is no compromise.
If at all possible, a challenge should be played out to its conclusion.
Players who are losing should fight for a compromise.
Gear for Conflicts Fighting Weapons Axe Deadly: +1s after a successful Attack.
Slow: -1D to Defend or Feint Bow Missile: Against short-ranged weapons, your Attack action counts as a versus action rather than independent against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Long Range: +2D to Maneuver against normal, spear or thrown weapons.
Hard to Defend: Add +1D to your Attack versus Defend.
Halberd Versatile: Halberds are versatile polearms.
They can be used either as a spear or an axe in order to use that weapon's qualities.
Choose which mode you're using before announcing your first action.
Hook and Line Hooked: +1D to Maneuver, +1s after a successful maneuver.
Unwieldy: -1D to Attack.
Knife Short and Quick: Any successful Maneuver when fighting with a knife, against a spear, thrown or missle weapon counts as the disarm effect.
This effect happens in addition to your margin of success for the maneuver action.
Thrown: When throwing a knife against a spear or normal weapon, your Attack action counts as versus against an opponents Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Once you throw your knife, it's gone!
Shield Protection: +2D to Defend.
Heavy: -1D Health to recover from fatigue if the shield was used in a fight during the last Turn.
Shields are generally used on their own - as defense and a weapon.
Sling Missile: Against shorter-ranged weapons, your Attack action counts as a versus action rather than independent against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Medium Range: +1D to Maneuver.
Spear Spear: Your Attack action counts as a versus action against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
This only mouse guard board game against spears and normal weapons.
The spear also gets a +1D to Maneuver actions against normal weapons.
Staff Handy: +1D to Feint actions.
May also be thrown.
When throwing a staff, your Attack action counts as a versus action against an opponent's Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
This only applies against spears and normal weapons.
Also, once you throw your staff, it's gone!
Sword Useful: +1D to one action of your choice in a fight.
You may choose the action at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the fight.
Note: If you have multiple weapons, you must choose a single weapon for a set of 3 actions.
Armor Armor must be worn at all times in order to provide the benefits.
Armor worn during the previous Turn imposes a penalty to recover from the Tired condition.
Light Armor +1D to your disposition roll for the fight.
Heavy: -1D to Health tests to resist fatigue.
Heavy Armor +1s to your disposition roll in a fight.
Clumsy: -1D to Maneuver tests.
Heavy: https://festes.ru/board-game/board-games-downtown-portland.html to Health tests to resist fatigue.
Weapons of Wit Weapons of wit are "weapons" you can use in an argument or speech.
These are mostly roleplaying cues.
They give you guidelines on what to say and how to say it.
Intimidation or Deception +1s to a successful Feint or Maneuver.
The intimidation or lie must be played out to gain the benefit.
Evidence +1s after a successful Attack.
If the character has pre-established evidence to support, he can display it and explain it on his Attack actions to gain benefit.
Roleplay The roleplay bonus is granted to players who deliver their lines in character.
Add +1D to one action of your choice in the argument or speech.
You may choose at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the argument.
If playing in a team, it sicks to that action for the team, not just the character.
Promises +1D to Defend.
If you make promises to the other side, you can gain this benefit.
The promises aren't binding unless they come back to haunt you in the compromise.
Repeating Yourself -1D to any action.
If you repeat the same points over and over, you're weakening your side.
You suffer a penalty for repetition.
Military Weapons Military weapons are materials, organizations or tactics that the military leader must acquire, muster or devise before the battle.
You can't make these up on the fly!
Cut to the Chase If you're playing out a chase conflict, you can use the following effects to gain advantages.
They are essentially "weapons" for a chase.
Locals or Smart Mice +1D to one action of your choice in the chase.
You may choose to apply the bonus at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the chase.
Mice who are chasing around their home turf earn this bonus.
Also, mice who have a wise appropriate to the terrain or locale may also take the bonus.
Maps +1D to the disposition roll.
Maps help you plan your escape better, but they don't help much in the heat of the moment.
There's little time to consult them once the chase is on.
Dirty Tricks +1s to a successful Feint.
Dirty tricks like tripwires, sand in the face or even a rock to the back of the head earn you the element of surprise.
The dirty trick must be described by the action player.
Dirty tricks can be invented on the fly or set in advance.
Right Tools for the Job +1s to Attack.
If your team is equipped for the terrain and weather, you earn an advantage.
Equipment like a rope, a ladder, camouflaged netting, snow shoes, skis or a boat can all be used to earn this bonus.
It's dependent on the situation.
If you're going to play this game, reading this is a fantastic primer.
Thanks to the author.
Thanks for this entire thread!
Quite well written and it has provided clearer help than Ive found elsewhere so I can run a Mouse Guard game.
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Rewards You earn rewards for the way you play your character in a session.
Rewards are accrued in points.
These points are used to modify dice rolls.
There are two types of point: fate points and persona points.
Rewards are distributed at the end of a session.
When play has ended, go around the table.
Each player in turn reads his Belief, Goal and Instinct.
If the group agrees that the criteria below are met, then the applicable reward is earned.
Fate Points There are three ways to earn fate points.
You may earn up to 3 fate points in one session.
You may earn up to 4 in one session.
Can be awarded to more than one player, but not to every player The Mission A mission will be introduced by the Game Master GM and will include the following elements: 1 Season of the year.
This can affect weather - which can also have a big impact on game play.
After the mission is introduced, the players will write down their mission Goal s on their character sheet.
It's easy to simply write the mission as your current Goal.
After awhile, though, that's going to get boring.
Fortunately, Goals are versatile.
You have a lot of leeway; you don't have to stick strictly to the mission.
Look at your Goals as a group: One player should always have a Goal about completing the mission.
You can color that with conditions or stipulations - how will he complete the Goal?
Other players can have: a Goal about another member of your patrol, a Goal about seeing something or retrieving something from the place you're going.
If you're family, mentor, friend or enemy is located near the mission objective, write a Goal about them.
Some examples: "I will protect Kenzie and Lieam on this patrol.
For without these tests, how does a mouse truly become a hero?
The GM's Turn There are 2 turns in a game session.
The GM's turn and then the Player's turn.
During the GM's turn, it's his job to beat the crap out of the players.
Well, their characters anyway.
Initially, the GM may provide options to overcome obstacles due to the inexperience of the players.
During the course of overcoming these obstacles, the mice may be inflicted with various conditions such as Hunger, Anger, Exhaustion, Injuries or Sickness.
A 'test' is a roll of the dice.
There are 3 kinds of obstacles guardsmice may face: 1 Simple obstacles - which usually only require 1 test.
If the player succeeds in testing against the obstacle, they get what they want which is usually to overcome the obstacleand the player and the GM can provide a little bit of color commentary about the achievement to celebrate the moment.
If the player fails, one of two things can happen: 1 The GM can decide that the obstacle was insurmountable, and can throw an unexpected twist into the story as a result, or 2 The GM can allow you to overcome the obstacle, but will apply a condition to the mouse tired, angry, etc.
In either case, the GM gets to describe the scene and what happens.
The Players' Role During the GM's Turn During the confrontation of these obstacles, the players will describe their character's reactions and actions as they attempt the tests.
The GM will evaluate the suggested course of action and will may set an obstacle number against which the player will need to test more on this later.
Players can use their traits to either help or hinder them when making these tests.
Incorporating a trait in a beneficial way will add bonus dice or even rerolls.
Using a trait against yourself, earns the player 'checks' which can be spent during the Players' Turn.
Checks are very valuable and useful.
It's your job to be proactive about earning them.
A hero risks himself to overcome his own weaknesses and improve the common good with his sacrifice.
Sometimes during the GM's turn, disagreements may arise amongst the players.
These disagreements can be resolved using in-game conflict test mechanics.
The GM's turn ends under one of three circumstances: 1 The patrol has completed its mission.
The play is then turned over to the Players for the Player's Turn.
The Players' Turn It's the GM's job to beat the crap out of your guardmice.
It's your job to survive the beating and overcome!
During the Players' Turn you may try to recover a bit and build up your resources in addition to taking care of other, miscellaneous business.
Checks and Tests Tests in the Players' Turn are limited.
Each player gets one free test.
You can use it for whatever you want - to recover, to find an old friend, to fashion new armor, to pick a fight or buy a gift for your love.
If you want more tests, you must spend the checks you earned against your traits in the GM's turn.
So remember, when you use your traits to get in your way during the GM's turn, it gives you more options to do more stuff in the Players' Turn.
When you've run out of checks, you're done for this turn.
Note 1: You cannot spend a check for a test twice in a row.
Note 2: You can donate checks to other players.
Note 3: Each player takes a turn spending 1 check at a time.
As soon as any player runs out of checks during a specific round, any players that haven't yet gone that round can finish, and then the Players' Turn is over.
Any excess checks are discarded.
Recover You may use a check to attempt to recover from one or more of your conditions Hungry, Angry, etc.
This will involve rolling a test more on this later.
Regroup You can make tests against your Resources value for things like equipment to help you continue.
Or against your Circles value to find help or allies, or against your craft skill to create useful items.
Picking Fights and Stuff You can also get into full-blown conflicts with fellow players' mice, your relationship characters or characters the GM has introduced.
It only costs one check to start a conflict.
Your victim doesn't have to spend anything to fight back.
Note: You may not use your traits against yourself to earn more checks during the Players' Turn GM's Role in the Players' Turn The GM doesn't get to sit around during the Players' Turn and just watch.
He has 3 very important duties: prompt the players with the rules, play the relationships and stay involved.
Obstacles In this game, an obstacle is broken down into 3 parts: 1 A description by the GM.
For example: To cross a frigid stream 1requires the characters to pass an obstacle 3 2 Health test 3.
To pass a test, you need a number of successes equal to or greater than the obstacles difficulty.
Successes are counted for each 4, 5 or 6 of each die rolled.
For example: Using the example above, if your Health ability is 5, you would get to roll 5 dice.
And you would need 3 successes to overcome that test because of it's rating.
Tests A test refers to a roll of the dice for a single ability or skill.
You make tests to overcome obstacles.
Who Makes the Test?
The player to volunteer first or think of the plan to overcome the obstacle must make the roll.
It doesn't matter if he has the lowest ability in the group or doesn't even have the right skill.
He's stepped up to the plate and he's got to take a swing.
We may need to re-evaluate this rule due to the nature of PBF Alternatively, the group can discuss a plan to overcome the obstacle, and if the GM approves the plan, the Patrol Leader may delegate who tackles which part of the obstacle.
The delegation is also subject to GM approval.
Describe Your Action Once the obstacle has been set by the GM, the player who's going to make the test describes his character's actions.
How is he going to overcome the test?
A good description of your actions goes a long way toward earning rewards at the end of the session.
Two Types of Tests There are two types of tests, one with a fixed obstacle - "independent" - and one where the obstacle is generated by rolling against another player or the GM - "versus".
Independent Tests When making an independent test, grab as many dice as your ability or skill's rating and give them a roll.
Each die that comes up 4 or better counts.
We call those dice successes.
Dice that come up 3 or lower don't count.
If you roll a number of successes equal to or greater than the obstacle, you've passed the test!
Versus Tests Versus tests are the best way to quickly resolve any dispute between two parties in the game.
They're exciting and tense!
When fighting with, racing against, convincing, pushing or competing with another character in the game, you use versus tests.
elf 619 board 1 game in your ability or skill's rating as described under Independent Tests.
Same rules for successes.
In this case, you pass your test if your roll more successes than your opponent does.
If rolling against the GM, the GM always rolls first and shows the player his successes.
If rolling against another Mouse Guard player, the senior guardmouse rolls first and shows his results to his junior opponent.
Making and Breaking Ties It's possible to use your traits or fate points to create ties.
If a versus test is tied, there are three ways to break it.
They may be used in the following order: 1 A trait may be called upon to break a tie in your OPPONENT'S favor.
Tiebreaker Rolls A tiebreaker roll is a second versus test between the two opponents.
If a skill was used in the initial tied versus test, Will or Health must be rolled to break the tie.
If the skill is physical in nature, test Health.
If the skill is mental- or social-oriented, test Will.
If Health or Will was used in the initial tied roll, Nature must be used for the tiebreaker.
Animals, other than mice or weasels, always test their Nature, even in ties.
If there is a second tie, the GM wins the test.
Or if it's a player versus player test, the GM determines the winner and applies a twist or condition on the players involved.
Passed Tests If you passed the test, you've overcome and escaped unscathed!
You may describe your success or let the GM embellish your actions with a shiny glow.
You can describe your characters actions, or what they say, as well as what happens, and how the situation has changed.
Failed Tests If you do not roll successes equal to or greater than your obstacle, you've failed this test.
First off, the GM gets to control your character for a little bit.
He gets to describe how you've misstepped or overreached.
Game-wise, one of two things can then happen, and the GM gets to decide which one he wants: You can fail to overcome the obstacle and the GM mouse guard board game inject a twist into the game, or you can SUCCEED at your attempt but at a COST.
The GM can't apply both.
Complex Obstacles Sometimes an obstacle is too complicated to bypass please click for source a single test.
The GM can declare that a number of abilities or skills must be tested in order to bypass the obstacle.
In this case, he can vary the obstacle number for the difficulty of the test for each ability.
They don't have to all be the same.
I Am Wise You may have your character use his varied experience to help himself on a test.
Wises are knowledge skills.
When testing a continue reading skill, you may call on one of your wises to help.
If the GM agrees that the wise is appropriate to the situation, you may add +1D to your skill test.
For example: "Hidey-hole-wise" can be added to my Nature when trying to escape a snake burrow, when searching an office for a secret room or when using Scout to find a bandit lair.
Gear Against Obstacles If a character has a piece of gear that's appropriate to a particular obstacle - a map, a sword, a bit of damning evidence - the GM may grant the character a +1D advantage to overcome the obstacle.
Teamwork Teamwork is important in this game.
Your patrol needs to work together to overcome the difficult obstacles in its path.
The group can come together and help the person who is making the test.
He makes the roll, the helpers give him dice.
In the game, the patrol acts as a team to overcome the obstacle.
In order to help, 3 conditions must be met: 1 The acting player must acknowledge and accept the help from his compatriots.
This probably needs to be adjusted for PBF 3 Any helping players must describe how they are helping.
How Can I Help?
Helping life free board game printable character allows you to donate a +1D to the roll.
This is called a "helping die".
Abilities Can Always Help Abilities If Nature, Will, Health, Resources or Circles link being tested, anyone can help.
Skills and Wises Help Skills and Wises If a skill or wise is being tested, you must help with one of your own skills or wises.
Your help must be appropriate to the situation.
Help is situational; it must make sense to the players.
The GM is the final arbiter on who and what can and can't help.
You Reap What You Sow Everyone who donates a die of help for a test is then bound by the results of the roll.
If the test is successful, everyone shares in the benefits.
If the test is failed, all of the helping characters share a similar fate.
If a condition is applied as the result of a failed test, to play crocodiles board game the player who rolled suffers that condition.
The helping players suffer a lesser condition of the GM's choosing.
Note: You may NOT help another mouse with a Will or Health test for recovery.
Beginner's Luck Nature can be used as a substitute for any ability or skill that you don't have See Tapping Nature later.
However, using Nature prevents the character from learning new skills.
If you'd like to learn a skill your character doesn't have, you shouldn't use your Nature.
Instead, use these Beginner's Luck rules.
If a character does not have an appropriate skill for a test, he may roll his Will or Health in place of Nature.
Total up the dice for the ability, wises, help mouse guard board game gear.
Make the test using half that number, rounded up.
If the skill is physical, use Health.
If the skill is mental or social, use Will.
Note: If an ability is at zero due to injury or sickness, you cannot test it using Beginner's Luck.
Conflicts Obstacles are great for creating hurdles for the patrol to leap, walls for them to climb, and paths for them to navigate.
But sometimes those hurdles are not enough.
Sometimes a moment is so important, we need to stop and focus on it: intense fight scenes in which we follow every sword stroke, heated arguments in which the fur really flies or breakneck chases that leave us dizzy and breathless.
In the game, we use "conflicts" to create those intense, detailed situations.
These are the turning points of a story.
A conflict scene needs active opponents on at least two sides.
Each side must want something.
They have to have an immediate goal - something they want to fight for, convince you of or escape from, for example.
Procedure for Conflicts In a conflict, we make many tests, but how we make them is different.
In order to keep the game interesting, each side privately chooses three actions to represent their strategy.
Then these actions are played against each other and tests are made to determine the results.
Here are the steps of a conflict: 1 Decide the type of conflict 2 Determine participants and teams 3 State goals.
Write yours on your team's sheet 4 Roll for your starting disposition 5 Check participant's conditions.
Modify dispositions accordingly 6 Choose 3 actions in private.
The GM chooses his actions first.
The GM reveals his first.
Consult the Actions table to see how your actions interact.
Add any modifiers from gear or weapons.
If either side's disposition is reduced to 0, stop.
Same rules as above.
Repeat previous steps until someone has disposition of 0.
Now to break these steps down: Determine Type of Conflict A conflict can be an argument, fight, chase, or any other action scene.
Argument If you need to convince another character or get information from him, use an argument.
Actions in argument conflicts are bits of in-character dialogue.
We play out the argument, point by point.
Chase When trying to catch or follow another mouse or an animal, you can use a chase conflict.
In chases, we describe our actions in terms of running, hiding, ducking and doubling back.
Fight Sometimes a guardmouse has to resort to physical force or violence in order to do his duty.
Actions in a fight conflict are blow-by-blow description of strikes, blocks, counterstrikes, pushes, cool disarms, diving for cover and general rollin'-around-fightin'!
Negotiation If you'd like to have a big negotiation about the price of goods or commodities or the nature of a contract, use a negotiation conflict.
In a negotiation conflict, you haggle over the price, complain about or praise the quality, and throw up your hands and wave them about.
Journey Your patrol will sometimes be called upon to undertake a long, dangerous journey in harsh weather.
If the GM decides it is appropriate, he can engage you in a journey conflict.
Actions are described in terms of survivalism, willpower, fortitude, bad weather, mishaps and wilderness.
Speech You can use your Orator skill to convince a gathering of mice to follow your thinking, or debate a political adversary in public and convince the audience that you're right.
You're opponent in a speech conflict can be another speechmaker, competing for the attention of the crowd, or it can be a mouse in the crowd, representative of their views.
Actions in a speech conflict or debate involve using rhetoric.
We make the speeches!
War Occasionally, the towns go to war or the mice have to muster against a big animal threat.
Characters with the Militarist skill may lead other mice into battle.
Actions in wars are described as attacks, subtle feints, holding actions, daring field maneuvers and valiant defenses.
Participants Often when you get into a conflict, you have multiple players working together toward a goal.
Therefore, we break down the participants of the conflict into teams using the following guidelines: 1 1 or 2 players - always 1 team.
This is the optimal team size.
You're your own team.
There are all sorts of methods for deciding who joins a team, friends, cloak color, patrol-leader assigned.
Generally, though, you should try to pick teams that complement each other.
Spread your Orators and Fighters so that each team has one, for example.
In some cases, you may decide to join the GM's team and oppose the other players.
GM players, however, can only help the other players using the teamwork rules aiding with helping dice for disposition rolls and tests for certain actions, for exampleand may not take actions.
You can also to choose to sit out of a conflict.
Conflict Goals Each team picks a short-term or immediate goal they wish to accomplish as a result of this conflict.
Conflict goals are similar to your character's session Goal.
Include a statement about your character, an action and a target.
Example: Saxon and Kenzie have been been captured by the oldfur Celanawe.
Celanawe accuses them of stealing his axe.
His goal: "You thieves will tell me what you've done with my axe!
Celanawe must help us stop them.
However, you've got to win with little or no compromise discussed later.
Starting Disposition To represent how strong your side's position is in this conflict, each team generates a number called "disposition".
This number represents your strength in the conflict.
play free games online monopoly board game disposition of 3 or less is low; 4 to 6 is OK; 7 and higher is strong.
During the conflict, you use all of your wits, luck and good looks to reduce your opponent's disposition to zero.
If you can do that, you've won.
To generate your team's disposition for a conflict, consult the Conflict Type on the next page.
The player who initiated the conflict tests the listed skill for his team.
The other team members may help.
The obstacle for the test is 0.
Add the successes of that roll to the rating of the tester's base ability listed for the type of conflict: Argument: Persuader skill + Will Chase: Scout + Health or Nature Fight: Fighter + Health or Nature Fight Animal: Fighter or Hunter + Health or Nature Journey: Pathfinder + Health Negotiation: Haggler + Will Speech: Orator + Will War: Militarist + Will Other: Attack + GM's discretion The seniormost mouse in the team should make a note of that number in the disposition shield next to the Conflict Goal on the back of his character sheet.
Note: Make sure to check your character's condition, traits and gear for modifiers to starting disposition!
Actions To play out the tense, tactical nature of a conflict, we use a specific structure.
Each team chooses three actions from the following list in advance: 1 Attack 2 Defend 3 Feint 4 Maneuver Each action has a different effect on how you test.
And each action interacts with the other actions in a different way.
Actions are chosen in sets of three, then revealed one at a time.
Once everyone's actions are revealed, we play out the interaction - roleplay and make tests.
Once everyone has picked, the GM or opposing player reveals his first action.
And then any subsequent teams.
Then the actions are resolved according the matrix below.
Actions 2 and 3 are resolved in the same way.
Make sure to roleplay your characters as they take their actions, and then roll the test dice.
Note: The four actions are abstract and can be applied to nearly any type of conflict.
You get to interpret them and make sure they fit the situation in the game.
Attack The Attack action lets you take a shot at your goal.
In a fight, this means whacking away at the enemy, or filling him full of arrows.
In an argument, this means making a strong, direct point.
In a chase, it means sprinting for the finish.
In a negotiation, an Attack exposes your opponent's weaknesses.
Attack reduces your opponent's disposition by the margin of success.
When used against an opponent's Attack or Feint action, it's an "Independent" 0 test, meaning you roll and however many successes you have reduce the opponents disposition by that number.
When used against an opponent's Defend or Maneuver, it's a "Versus" test.
Meaning that welcome to real vegas board game instructions compare the number of successes against your opponent's number of successes.
Whoever has more reduces their opponent's disposition by the difference.
Defend The Mouse guard board game action protects and strengthens your position.
In a fight, this can mean blocking your enemy's weapon.
In an argument, it flintstone board game represent an excellent rebuttal.
In a chase, a Defend action can represent carefully picking a path or covering your tracks.
Defend played against Attack or Maneuver is a versus test.
Against another Defend, the actions are independent 3 tests.
When played against a Feint, Defend may not test.
Defend stops or reduces the effectiveness of Attack and Maneuver actions.
If Defend successes are greater than the versus action, add the margin of success to your disposition.
Disposition cannot go higher than the starting total.
Feint A Feint represents a sneak attack.
It's dangerous to try, but if it works, it's very effective.
In a fight, a Feint is a feint!
In an argument, it's a misleading point used to get your opponent to say something foolish that you can use against him.
Feint is a special attack.
If played against Defend, the Defender may not test.
The Feinter makes an Independent 0 test; your target's disposition is reduced by your margin of success.
If played against board most game difficult Attack, the Feinting player may not attack or defend.
If played against another Feint, make a versus test.
The margin of success is subtracted from the loser's disposition.
If played against Maneuver, test Feint at Ob 0.
Successes are removed from your opponent's disposition.
Maneuver The Maneuver action is used to, well, maneuver, gaining an advantage over your opponent.
In a fight, a Maneuver can be a push or a flanking move.
The Maneuver action is used to gain a temporary advantage over your opponent.
It's the most complex action of the four.
The Maneuver action has 3 possible effects: impede, gain position and disarm.
Each effect requires a certain margin of success.
You can't use the same effect twice on the same action, but you can use an effect again if you play another successful Maneuver on a subsequent action.
Played against Attack or Defend, Maneuver is a versus test.
Played against Feint or another Maneuver, the Maneuver is tested independently 0.
Margin of success is applied to the effects described below: Margin of success 1: Impede: -1D disadvantage to your opponent's next action.
This is applied to the character making the test next action if there are multiple players on the opposing team s.
Margin of success 2: Gain Posision: +2D advantage to your next action.
Again, this applies only to the player making the test next action.
Margin of success 3: Disarm: Remove one of your opponent's weapons, a piece of gear or disable a trait for the remainder of the conflict.
Alternately, if you win by a margin of success of 3, you may impede AND gain position.
Here's a matrix of the actions and what types of tests against other:.
I Which Skill Do I Use?
Each type of conflict uses a different skill set.
Two players alternate back and forth.
Three players each get one action out of the set of three.
No player on a team can take two actions in a row.
Make sure the player taking the action has the appropriate skill for that action.
Because once it's set, that player is doing the test regardless.
This needs to be decided before the GM reveals his first action.
Winning, Losing and Tying a Conflict If you reduce your opponent's disposition to zero you win the conflict and achieve your goal.
However, if you lost points from your own disposition, you have to compromise with the loser.
If your disposition is reduced to zero while your opponent has points left, you have lost.
You do not accomplish your goal as stated.
If both sides are reduced to zero disposition in the same action, the conflict is a tie.
Both sides accomplish their goals.
This is a very dangerous outcome!
Compromise If you lost, but took points off your opponent's disposition, he must offer you a compromise.
Compromises are like twists, but in this case they are the result of the whole conflict, not just a failed roll.
And players also get to introduce compromises, not just the GM.
Once the conflict has ended, the first thing you do is compromise.
The loser makes an offer to the winner, "Fine, you win, but.
The results of a conflict are set - the winner achieved his goal, the loser did not.
Now discuss an appropriate middle ground for the compromise.
The whole group must decide if the compromise is appropriate.
If everyone complains that the compromise is too much or inappropriate, the loser can change the terms.
If no consensus can be reached, the GM can approve the compromise or ask the loser to modify his terms.
There are 3 grades to compromises - a minor compromise, a compromise and a major compromise.
Minor Compromise If the winner lost less game board candyland play online half his disposition, he owes the loser a minor compromise.
The loser may ask for a small part of his goal or something related to it.
Minor compromises can be used to set up a follow-up conflict or to apply changes to the winner's condition angry, or tired, for exampleand that would apply to all the members of the team.
Compromise: Lost About Half If the winner comes out of all aboard board game review conflict with only half of his disposition, he owes the loser a significant concession.
The loser doesn't get his goal, but imagine he got halfway there.
Or the loser could accept defeat, but introduce a new, unforeseen complication that has arisen due to the winner's victory.
This is how a player creates a twist.
Alternately, the loser could offer a compromise in which he gets nothing, but the winner only got halfway to his goal.
Good luck convincing the winner to agree.
Major Compromise: Lost All but a Few If the winner's disposition is reduced to just a few points, he has won a very narrow victory indeed.
He must grant a major compromise best strategy games board the loser.
Imagine the loser nearly accomplished his goal, but was only thwarted at the end.
What would that look like?
Or what major new twist could be introduced because of this victory?
Compromises can be used to extract promises, change the way a character feels about you, or throw a wrench in the works.
They can be used to hurt your enemy, too.
But you can't use a compromise to accomplish your conflict goal.
If you didn't win, you don't get your goal.
Surrender You may surrender during a conflict.
The surrendering player hands total victory to his opponent.
There is no compromise.
If at all possible, a challenge should be played out to its conclusion.
Players who are losing should fight for a compromise.
Gear for Conflicts Fighting Weapons Axe Deadly: +1s after a successful Attack.
Slow: -1D to Defend or Feint Bow Missile: Against short-ranged weapons, your Attack action counts as a versus action rather than independent against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Long Range: +2D to Maneuver against normal, spear or thrown weapons.
Hard to Defend: Add +1D to your Attack versus Defend.
Halberd Versatile: Halberds are versatile polearms.
They can be used either as a spear or an continue reading in order to use that weapon's qualities.
Choose which mode you're using before announcing your first action.
Hook and Line Hooked: +1D to Maneuver, +1s after a successful maneuver.
Unwieldy: -1D to Attack.
Knife Mouse guard board game and Quick: Any successful Maneuver when fighting with a knife, against a spear, thrown or missle weapon counts as the disarm effect.
This effect happens in addition to your margin of success for the maneuver action.
Thrown: When throwing a knife against a spear or normal weapon, your Attack action counts as versus against an opponents Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Once you throw your knife, it's gone!
Shield Protection: +2D to Defend.
Heavy: -1D Health to recover from fatigue if the shield was used in a fight during the last Turn.
Shields are generally used on their own - as defense and a weapon.
Sling Missile: Against shorter-ranged weapons, your Attack action counts as a versus action rather than independent against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
Medium Range: +1D to Maneuver.
Spear Spear: Your Attack action counts as a versus action against Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
This only applies against spears and normal weapons.
The spear also gets a +1D to Maneuver actions against normal weapons.
Staff Handy: +1D to Feint actions.
May also be thrown.
When throwing a staff, your Attack action counts as a versus action against an opponent's Attack and is independent against Maneuver.
This only applies against spears and normal weapons.
Also, once you throw your staff, it's gone!
Sword Useful: +1D to one action of your choice in a fight.
You may choose the action at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the fight.
Note: If you have multiple weapons, you must choose a single weapon for a set of 3 actions.
Armor Armor must be worn at all times in order to provide the benefits.
Armor worn during the previous Turn imposes a penalty to recover from the Tired condition.
Light Armor +1D to your disposition roll for the fight.
Heavy: -1D to Health tests to resist fatigue.
Heavy Armor +1s to your disposition roll in a click here />Clumsy: -1D to Maneuver tests.
Heavy: -1D to Health tests to resist fatigue.
Weapons of Wit Weapons of wit are "weapons" you can use in an argument or speech.
These are mostly roleplaying cues.
They give you guidelines on what to say and how to say it.
Intimidation or Deception +1s to a successful Feint or Maneuver.
The intimidation or lie must be played out to gain the benefit.
Evidence +1s after a successful Attack.
If the character has pre-established evidence to support, he can display it and explain it on his Attack actions to gain benefit.
Roleplay The roleplay bonus is granted to players who deliver their lines in character.
Add +1D to one action of your choice in the argument or speech.
You may choose at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the argument.
If playing in a team, it sicks to that action for the team, not just the character.
Promises +1D to Defend.
If you make promises to the other side, you can gain this benefit.
The promises aren't binding unless they come back to haunt you in the compromise.
Repeating Yourself -1D to any action.
If you repeat the same points over and over, you're weakening your side.
You suffer a penalty for repetition.
Military Weapons Military weapons are materials, organizations or tactics that the military leader must acquire, muster or devise before the battle.
You can't make these up on the fly!
Cut to the Chase If you're playing out a chase conflict, you can use the following effects to gain advantages.
They are essentially "weapons" for a chase.
Locals or Smart Mice +1D to one action of your choice in the chase.
You may choose to apply the bonus at any point during the conflict.
Once chosen, the bonus die sticks to that action for the remainder of the chase.
Mice who are chasing around their home turf earn this bonus.
Also, mice who have a wise appropriate to the terrain or locale may also take the bonus.
Maps +1D to the disposition roll.
Maps help you plan your escape better, but they don't help much in the heat of the moment.
There's little time to consult them once the chase is on.
Dirty Tricks +1s to a successful Feint.
Dirty tricks like tripwires, sand in the face or even a rock to the back of the head earn you the element of surprise.
The dirty trick must be described by the action player.
Dirty tricks can be invented on the fly or set in advance.
Right Tools see more the Job +1s to Attack.
If your team is equipped for the terrain and weather, you earn an advantage.
Equipment like a rope, a ladder, camouflaged netting, snow shoes, skis or a boat can all be used to earn this bonus.
It's dependent on the situation.
If you're going to play this game, reading this is a fantastic primer.
Thanks to the author.
Thanks for this entire thread!
Quite well written and it has provided clearer help than Ive found elsewhere so I can run a Mouse Guard game.
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Custom board game for use with Mouse Guard: Swords & Strongholds Kickstarter game; Fuse the plates at the edges or use embedded magnets to snap the two halves together; if you are fortunate to have a large enough build plat it should print in one sitting...


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Mouse Guard: How the Game Works | Coven | BoardGameGeek
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A two-player board game from the Mouse Guard comics—for mouse guard board game, patrons of the June Alley Inn and their fans.
Recently, he asked Luke Crane of and the Mouse Guard RPG to come up with some rules for the game and so we did!
We developed a light strategy game for two players that takes 10 to 20 minutes time per game.
It's exactly the sweet spot we hoped for—a game you can play while you're sitting at the June Alley Inn listening to tales, or when you're waiting for your friends to arrive for a game night, or when you're waiting in long lines at comicons!
After he depicted the game in the comics, David created a prototype based on his drawings.
This is mouse guard board game we started with for the game design.
The game has a wooden gridded board, four mouse pawns for each player and a deck of sword, stronghold and diplomacy cards.
After we created the initial rules, we sent out mouse guard board game print and play version to our friends and fans to play test for us.
Notably, Scott and Rym from the gave it a good thrashing for us.
We want to do a small production run with high quality components for Mouse Guard fans everywhere and we need your help to do it.
We'd much rather show this game to you so you can tell us what you mouse guard board game than https://festes.ru/board-game/joker-board-game-with-marbles.html on printing off a bunch and shipping them straight into distribution.
David and I love our fans and we want you to be a part of making this game.
The game will be contained in a cardboard two piece box with a full color wrap.
A few lucky backers can acquire some of David's original art for the game.
We're offering, individually, the face mouse guard board game each card and the card back.
Each piece is 4.
The original inks for the cover are 8.
It's a unique piece by David, since his typical pieces are character commissions and comic art.
Risks and challenges This game will be published by The Burning Wheel.
I've published over a dozen titles through Burning Wheel, including a boxed set game, but this will be link first board game.
Making board games can be hard!
Pick up your copy at the con if it's ready!
Pick up your copy at the con if it's ready!
Pick up your copy at the con if it's ready!
You'll also receive a print and play version of the game.
You'll also receive a print and play version of mouse guard board game game.
A deluxe version of the game with a hardwood board, cast metal mouse pawns and fancy cards all kept in a mouse guard board game, felt-lined box and a signed copy of the game.

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A light strategy game for two players, from the setting of the Mouse Guard comics and roleplaying game. Each player control four mouse pawns on a gridded board. Play involves a deck containing three types of cards: Swords, Strongholds, and Diplomacy.


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Mouse Guard: Swords & Strongholds by Burning Wheel — Kickstarter
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Mouse Guard was one of several projects greenlit before the acquisition. Death on the Nile and the Ryan Reynolds video game movie Free Guy were among the other handful of titles on the greenlight.


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MouseGuard by David Petersen
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Mouse Guard: Swords & Strongholds by Burning Wheel — Kickstarter
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